The page uses Browser Access Keys to help with keyboard navigation. Click to learn moreSkip to Navigation

Different browsers use different keystrokes to activate accesskey shortcuts. Please reference the following list to use access keys on your system.

Alt and the accesskey, for Internet Explorer on Windows
Shift and Alt and the accesskey, for Firefox on Windows
Shift and Esc and the accesskey, for Windows or Mac
Ctrl and the accesskey, for the following browsers on a Mac: Internet Explorer 5.2, Safari 1.2, Firefox, Mozilla, Netscape 6+.

We use the following access keys on our gateway

n Skip to Navigation
k Accesskeys description
h Help
Scripps College    
 
    
 
  Jul 25, 2017
 
2013-2014 Academic Catalog THIS IS AN ARCHIVED CATALOG. LINKS MAY NO LONGER BE ACTIVE AND CONTENT MAY BE OUT OF DATE!

Financial Aid



Financial aid at Scripps College is designed to provide admitted students financial assistance to enable them to enroll in the College. The College is committed to offering financial aid to continuing students in the same manner that entering first-year students are offered aid: based on the College’s determination of each student’s demonstrated financial need and each family’s particular circumstances. The calculation of the annual cost of education less a family’s expected contribution will result in a student’s demonstrated financial need. 

Annual Cost of Education

Educational expenses for the academic year include tuition and standard fees, an allowance for room and board, books and supplies, personal expenses, and loan fees that may be associated with your student loans.

The estimated 2013-2014 expenses for residential students are:

Tuition and Fees $45,564
Room $7,570
Board $6,436
Books and Supplies $800
Personal Expenses $1,000
Total Costs $61,370

Application Process

Scripps College determines a family’s expected contributions toward educational costs based on information provided on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), the CSS/Financial Aid PROFILE form, and additional documents as requested. Both parents are expected to contribute to a student’s educational expenses. A non-custodial parent must submit the non-custodial PROFILE and may be expected to contribute toward total expenses. Students are expected to contribute a portion of summer earnings and other assets.

Scholarships and Grants

To meet a student’s demonstrated financial need, Scripps College provides a financial aid package that typically consists of scholarships, grants, student employment, and student loans. To be eligible for any federal aid (grant, work-study, or loan), students must be U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens, demonstrate financial need, meet specific enrollment criteria, and make satisfactory academic progress toward a degree.

Grants provided by Scripps College are awarded for up to eight full-time semesters, provided a student meets the financial and academic eligibility requirements. Transfer students are eligible to receive institutional grant funds based on their academic standing at the time they are admitted to Scripps. For example, if a student enters Scripps as a second semester sophomore, the student is eligible for five semesters of institutional grant assistance.

For less than full-time students, the financial aid award of institutional grant and scholarship funds will be adjusted according to the reduced cost of tuition and fees as long as the student is enrolled three-quarter time (2.5 courses) or more. Institutional grant funds are not available for students enrolled half time or less.

Private (Outside) Scholarships: These awards include funds from sources such as local civic and philanthropic organizations, National Merit awards, and similar sources.

Private (outside) scholarships are considered part of a student’s financial resources, as required by federal regulations. A student must inform the Office of Financial Aid, in writing, when notified of any scholarship awards from National Merit, local or civic organizations, tuition grants from employers, etc. Loan amounts may then be reduced by the amount of aid received from outside sources. Work awards and grants may be reduced if outside scholarships exceed loan amounts.

Federal and State Grants: Federal and state grants include the Federal Pell Grant, the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG), Cal Grants A and B, and other state funds. The College expects every financial aid applicant who is a resident of California to submit the FAFSA and the Cal Grant Grade Point Average (GPA) Verification form by the deadline (March 2) to the California Student Aid Commission.

Student Employment

If students are eligible for Federal Work-Study or Scripps campus employment, they are eligible to earn an amount up to $2,200 per year to help cover the cost of their education. 

Scripps College strongly urges students to use good judgment about the amount of time spent on employment, both on- and off-campus. A job should not interfere with the demands of academic course work.

Loans

Low-cost loans enable borrowers to defer a portion of the cost of college until after graduation or withdrawal from school, when such loans are generally expected to be repaid over a 10-year period. The terms of repayment vary depending upon the type of loan.

Various types of loans are available: (1) Federal Perkins Loans are arranged between the student and the federal government with the assistance of the Office of Financial Aid. (2) Federal Direct Loans are arranged between the student and the Federal government with certification by a financial aid administrator of the College. (3) Scripps Private Loan funds are made available through donations from several foundations, including the Joseph Drown Foundation and the Ralph N. Parsons Foundation. Most loan principal payments plus interest begin six or nine months after leaving the College or dropping below half-time status. Sample repayment schedules are available in the Office of Financial Aid.

Information about loan programs that are of the most benefit in providing additional help to students and families may be found at www.scrippscollege.edu/financial-aid/2013-educationalloans.php.

International Students

There is a limited amount of need-based financial assistance available for international students and competition is keen. International applicants are also considered for merit-based money. International students must submit the College Board International Student Certification Finances or, if applying for need-based aid, the CSS/Financial Aid PROFILE by February 1 of the year prior to enrollment.

Off-Campus Study

Scripps College makes every effort to assist Scripps students who are pursuing an off-campus program of study, provided they are fully enrolled at Scripps College and their plans have been approved by the Office of Off-Campus Study.

If a student chooses to participate in a College-approved off-campus study program, any Federal Work-Study award is converted to an additional loan, plus an additional $500 in loan per semester of off-campus study to help defray the additional expenses associated with studying abroad.

How to Apply for Financial Aid

Entering Scripps students must file:

• CSS / Financial Aid PROFILE and
• The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and
• Additional required documents will be submitted to IDOC

Application deadlines may be found at: www.scrippscollege.edu/financial-aid/index.php .

Returning students must file:

• The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and
• Any additional documents, as requested each year

Application deadlines may be found at: http://www.scrippscollege.edu/financial-aid/forms/201314/2013-14_Renewal_Application_Process.pdf .

Financial Aid Regulations

The demonstrated financial need of all aid recipients is calculated and reviewed and all forms must be submitted annually. If the applicant fails to meet the satisfactory academic progress standards that have been set by the College, or if the demonstrated need for financial aid ceases, Scripps College reserves the right to discontinue financial aid in any form. The College also reserves the right to correct any award at any time.

Financial information provided by the family to the Office of Financial Aid will be kept confidential.

Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid

Federal regulations that became effective on July 1, 2011 (Sections 668.16(e), 668.32(f) and 668.34) require that all schools monitor the academic progress of each applicant for federal financial assistance and that the school certify that the applicant is making satisfactory academic progress toward earning his/her degree. This determination of progress must be made at least once a year and before the Office of Financial Aid disburses any federal aid funds for the subsequent semester. Federal and state student aid programs include Federal Pell Grants, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG), Cal Grants, Federal Work-Study, Federal Perkins Loans, Federal Direct Subsidized or Unsubsidized Direct Loans, Federal Direct PLUS Loans. For Federal Direct PLUS Loans, the parent borrower’s eligibility to receive loan funds is dependent on the student’s SAP status.

The following constitutes Scripps College’s policy on satisfactory academic progress.

Maximum time frame to earn the degree: At Scripps, the maximum time frame for federal financial aid recipients to receive a degree cannot exceed 150% of the published length of the program measured in courses attempted. The maximum time frame for students is 48 attempted courses (32 x 150% = 48). Students will forfeit their eligibility to participate in federal financial aid programs after six years of full-time enrollment (4 years x 150% = 6 years).

A student entering Scripps as a first-time, full-time first-year student is eligible for eight full-time semesters of financial aid in which to complete the degree. As expressed in years, this means that students are normally expected to complete their degree by the end of four years of full-time study. Students who require additional semesters to complete their degree are eligible for federal aid but not for state or institutional aid administered by Scripps College.

Financial aid eligibility for transfer students is limited to the number of full-time semesters remaining for successful completion of the Scripps degree after transfer credit is awarded. This determination is made during the transfer student’s first semester of enrollment at Scripps and the student will be notified in writing by the Office of Financial Aid.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards

Scripps’ Satisfactory Academic Progress policy must specify the quantitative (time-based) and qualitative (grade-based) requirements for a student to be considered to be making satisfactory academic progress. The quantitative requirement is the pace at which a student must progress through the educational program to ensure that the student will complete the program within the required time frame, and provides for measurement of the student’s progress at each evaluation. The qualitative requirement is that, at the end of the second academic year, the student must have a cumulative GPA of at least a 2.0.

Quantitative Standard (Time Based)

For a full-time student to be considered making satisfactory academic progress, the student must complete a minimum of six courses at the end of two semesters, a total of 14 courses after four semesters; a total of 22 courses after six semesters, and a total of 32 courses in order to receive the bachelor’s degree at the end of eight semesters.

A student is expected to complete four courses per semester to graduate in four years, and for satisfactory academic progress the minimum completion rates by semester are shown in the table below:

The percentage of normal completion is calculated by dividing the minimum course completion by the normal course completion. (For example, six courses completed/eight courses to advance grade level = 75% completion rate.)

Semesters completed Normal completion of courses Minimum completion of courses Percent of normal completion
2 8 6 75%
4 16 14 87.5%
6 24 22 91.6%

Attempted courses are those courses for which the student was still officially enrolled after the last date to drop courses. Withdrawals showing as a W on the student’s academic transcript are counted as attempted courses. All courses count in calculating a student’s academic progress, including any for which the student did not receive financial aid.

Withdrawals: Grades of W are counted as courses attempted and count toward the maximum time frame.

Audited Courses: Students do not earn any academic credit for audited courses. They do not count in the calculation of “attempted courses.”

Repeated Courses: Academic policy at Scripps states that if a student does not receive a passing grade for a course (no academic credit accepted), the course may be repeated for credit. Repeating a course does not remove the original course from the academic transcript. Both the grade for the original course and the repeated course will be posted and will calculate into the student’s grade point average. Both the original course and the repeated course will be considered as attempted in the calculation of “attempted courses” for purposes of determining satisfactory academic progress.

Pass/Fail Courses: Courses taken on a pass/fail basis count toward the total of attempted and completed courses.

Transfer Credit: Transfer credit from another institution accepted by Scripps College are counted when measuring the maximum time frame to complete the degree. Scripps does not accept for credit any transfer grades lower than C (2.0). Refer to the Enrollment section of the catalog.

Double Majors and/or Minors: Students who pursue a double major or a minor(s) are expected to complete all degree requirements within the 32-course limit.

Qualitative Standards: (Grade Based—The Quality of Your Performance)

During the first four semesters of enrollment for a student entering as a first-year, full-time student, the qualitative standards for making progress will not be monitored by the Office of Financial Aid but by the Committee on Academic Review (CAR) in accordance with Scripps’ policy. During the first four semesters, a student who is allowed to re-enroll and is placed on a Committee on Academic Review (CAR) contract is eligible for financial aid and will be expected to meet the minimum standards outlined by CAR for continued enrollment.

In accordance with federal regulations (sections 668.16(e), 668.32(f) and 668.34), a student must have at least a 2.0 cumulative GPA by the end of the second year of enrollment to be considered to be making satisfactory academic progress for continued participation in federal aid programs. A student who does not achieve at least a 2.0 cumulative GPA will be ineligible to participate in federal financial aid programs until this deficiency is corrected.

Students who are receiving financial aid while on an academic contract must resolve all incomplete grades before the Office of Financial Aid can make a final determination that they have met the satisfactory academic progress guidelines.

Consequences of Failure to Make Satisfactory Academic Progress

The student’s record will be reviewed at the end of each semester to determine that the student is meeting both the qualitative and quantitative standards described above. However, the student has the first four semesters in which to attain a 2.0 GPA. If a student has reached the maximum number of attempted courses without earning a degree, the student is ineligible for further participation in federal, state, or institutional financial aid programs.

Federal regulations require that these standards apply to all students receiving financial aid, even to first-time aid applicants who have previously enrolled at Scripps, or to those who have not been formally placed on probation.

A student who fails to meet the qualitative and/or quantitative standards will be assigned one of the following SAP Status designations.

Financial Aid Warning

The first time a student fails to achieve either the quantitative or qualitative standard, the student will receive a “Financial Aid Warning” letter, which will remind the student of the minimum academic requirements for receiving financial aid and will strongly encourage the student to take advantage of academic services that are available. A student will be eligible to receive federal, state, and institutional financial aid during this semester. The student will be notified that records will be reviewed again at the end of the “warning” semester and that further action may be taken if there is not significant improvement during that semester. Students may only receive financial aid for one semester under this warning status. Students who fail to achieve satisfactory academic progress by the end of the Financial Aid Warning period are ineligible to receive further federal, state, or institutional financial aid.

Right to Appeal

A student has the right to appeal a satisfactory academic progress determination of ineligibility. An appeal must be filed within 30 days of notification that aid eligibility has been lost or 30 days after a semester begins (whichever comes first). The appeal must be made in writing to the Director of Financial Aid. The appeal may not be based on the student’s need for financial assistance or the student’s lack of knowledge that aid was in jeopardy. An appeal is normally based on some extenuating situation or condition which prevented the student from passing more of the attempted courses or which necessitated withdrawal from classes or which led to failure to achieve a 2.0 GPA. Examples of possible extenuating circumstances include documented serious illness, severe injury, or death of a family member. A student will be placed on Financial Aid Probation (see below) if an academic plan is developed for the student that will ensure that the student is able to meet Scripps’ satisfactory academic progress standards by a specified point in time. A student who does not have grounds for an appeal, or whose appeal is denied, may still be able to regain eligibility for future semesters by enrolling at Scripps at the student’s own expense—without federal or institutional financial assistance—and achieving satisfactory academic progress both qualitatively and quantitatively.

The appeal process starts with an appointment with a Financial Aid Counselor. 

Appeal Approval: An appeal will be approved if it is determined that

  • the student will be able to meet Scripps’ satisfactory academic progress standard by the end of the subsequent semester; or
  • an academic plan is developed for the student that will ensure that the student is able to meet Scripps’ satisfactory academic progress standards by a specified point in time.

A student whose appeal is approved will receive aid on a conditional basis for one semester. The conditions will be outlined in the letter sent to the student approving the appeal. The Office of Financial Aid will review the student’s record at the end of the semester to determine the status for the following semester. A student who fails to meet the conditions outlined in the individual letter during the conditional semester will not be able to submit a subsequent appeal.

Financial Aid Probation

A student who receives a Financial Aid Warning and who still does not meet satisfactory progress standards may be placed on Financial Aid Probation after a successful appeal to reinstate eligibility for federal, state, and institutional financial aid. Students will normally be allowed only one probationary semester during their academic program.

A student on financial aid probation will receive a separate letter that will outline the academic requirements the student must meet in order to receive aid the following semester. If the student on financial aid probation meets the terms of the probation, the student will be eligible for federal financial aid in the next and subsequent semesters. The Office of Financial Aid will review the record of a student who is on financial aid probation at the end of the semester. A student who does not meet the terms of the financial aid probation will lose eligibility for all federal, state, and institutional financial aid programs.

Loss of Eligibility

A student who has lost eligibility to participate in federal student aid programs for reasons of academic progress can regain that eligibility only by enrolling at Scripps at the student’s own expense and demonstrating that the capability of completing a semester without any failures, incompletes, or withdrawals and showing the ability to complete the degree requirements. The mere passage of time will not restore eligibility to a student who has lost eligibility for failure to make satisfactory academic progress.

Students who have been dismissed from Scripps for academic reasons but who are subsequently readmitted are not automatically eligible to participate in federal, state, or institutional aid program and will be placed on financial aid warning. Readmissions decisions are separate from funding decisions.

Financial Aid Awards

A conditional financial aid offer is used for planning purposes prior to each student’s first year at Scripps College. Award offers must be considered conditional until all necessary documentation has been received by the Office of Financial Aid and verification of information is complete. Students returning for their second, third, and fourth years will receive only an official award after their aid eligibility has been determined.

Verification

Scripps College verifies information for all entering financial aid applicants, and selected returning students. To facilitate this process, the Office of Financial Aid must receive the following:

  1. The appropriate (dependent or independent) Scripps College Verification Worksheet.
  2. Signed copies of the family’s federal tax return including W-2 forms as well as all schedules and attachments:
    1. Dependent students are required to send a signed copy of their own and their parents’ tax return.
    2. Independent students are required to send signed copies of their own federal tax return.
    3. Any other documents determined necessary and appropriate by the Scripps Office of Financial Aid and/or the Federal or state government(s).
  3. Those selected for Federal Verification are also required to complete the IRS Data Retrieval process. This is one of the FAFSA’s newest tools that provides financial aid applicants and their families the ability to automatically transfer family income and tax data from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).

Once the College has completed its analysis, an official aid eligibility determination will be issued. If the data provided on the original forms is accurate, the conditional award should not change significantly. The Office of Financial Aid will contact the student if further information is needed.

Financial Aid Disbursement

The Office of Student Accounts sends statements for the fall semester two months before the first day of class. If the award has been finalized, aid from Scripps College grants and scholarships are shown as a credit toward tuition and fees and other direct Colleges expenses including but not limited to room and board. Scholarships and grants from outside organizations are credited as expected aid until funds are received by the College. Students are required to provide the Office of Financial Aid with information pertaining to these scholarships (expected dates of payment and contact information for the scholarship organization) and to bring any checks from such scholarships to the Office of Financial Aid so their accounts can be properly credited. Loan funds are recorded as a credit to a student’s account once the College has received completed and signed forms (and the pre-approval form in case of PLUS loans). For the first two bills of the fall semester, Federal Direct Stafford, Federal Parent (PLUS), and Federal Perkins loans, as well as other loan proceeds, are credited as “expected aid” in anticipation of receiving the appropriate application items and promissory notes. If the receipt of “actual” financial aid funds creates a credit balance, a refund check will be issued upon written request by the responsible billing party. Federal Work-Study (FWS) funds are paid biweekly to students over the course of the academic year.

Students may contact the Office of Student Accounts to inquire about using work-study earnings to cover any balance due to the College, or for questions about Scripps College payment plans at (909) 621-8259.

Using the Scripps College Installment Payment Plan, a student’s annual fees, minus financial aid, can be paid in eight equal installments, or four per semester. A non-refundable service charge of $50 per semester is added to the total charges. For more information, contact Student Accounts.

Revision of Award

Scripps College reserves the right to revise an award due to changes in federal, state, or Scripps College regulations or funding levels, and/or due to any changes relevant to eligibility determination as proven by documented information.

If a student receives financial aid or additional financial resources from any other source after the FAFSA and/or CSS Financial Aid/PROFILE have been filed, or after Scripps College has made a financial aid offer, the student must notify the Office of Financial Aid. An adjustment will be made in the College’s financial aid offer so that it will not exceed the financial need of the student (as required by federal and state regulations). The self-help portion (e.g., loan and part-time employment) may be reduced when a student brings in outside (non-state, federal, or institutional) grants or scholarships.

If financial changes arise after an award has been made, the student should contact the Office of Financial Aid to explain the nature and extent of the change. Each case will be reviewed on an individual basis. When a greater financial need is determined (and the student continues to meet eligibility criteria), the Office of Financial Aid will try to make the necessary adjustments to the student’s award as long as funds are available.

Refunds and Repayments

A student who withdraws from Scripps College during an academic semester may need to return some portion of financial aid to the source of financial aid based on the percentage of the academic semester that has been completed. This may, in some circumstances, require repayment of funds to Scripps College, the federal government, the state grant agency, the aid provider, and/or the lender that provided the financial aid funds.

Further details on the calculation of refunds and repayments provided to students at the time of withdrawal are at: www.scrippscollege.edu/about/expenses.php.

If a student withdraws from the College during the semester, the student may be eligible for a tuition refund based on the schedule outlined in the Scripps College Academic Catalog (www.scrippscollege.edu/about/expenses.php). Financial aid recipients will have their financial aid reevaluated according to the mandated federal formula and returned to the appropriate funds, if necessary.

Appeals

Students and their parents are invited to make a written request for a reevaluation or change in an award any time prior to April 1 of the award year. Requests for reconsideration are considered only if there has been a change in the family’s financial circumstances since the submission of that year’s FAFSA and/or PROFILE. Among the types of appeals considered are a request to change a student loan to additional student employment up to the maximum allowable (or vice versa) or a request for reevaluation based on a major change in family circumstances (i.e. loss of employment, extraordinary medical expenses, etc.). Such appeals must include sufficient documentation to substantiate the requests.

Should a student have an issue that cannot be resolved in this manner, the student may submit a letter to the Vice President for Enrollment.

Renewal of Financial Aid Awards

Financial aid is not renewed automatically. Each student is responsible for completing the the applications required to renew financial aid for the following academic year. The renewal process must be completed no later than May 1 in order to receive priority awarding for the next year. Students who are participating in study-abroad programs, living off-campus, or taking a leave of absence must take special care to stay informed of the financial aid application deadlines and application requirements during their times away from Scripps.

Financial Aid Code of Conduct and Code of Ethics

Scripps College adheres to a Financial Aid Code of Conduct and a Code of Ethics. Both of these documents may be found on the Office of Financial Aid website at: www.scrippscollege.edu/financial-aid/code-of-conduct.php www.scrippscollege.edu/financial-aid/code-of-ethics.php

Financial Aid Recipient Rights

Financial aid recipients have the right to:

  • have their eligibility for financial aid determined in a manner that is consistent and impartial for all applicants.
  • privacy. All records and data submitted with their application for financial aid will be treated as confidential, subject to legal requirements concerning disclosure of such information.
  • a complete explanation of the award process. If aid recipients do not understand their financial aid award or feel their application has not been evaluated fairly, please contact the Office of Financial Aid.
  • be notified of cancellation or withdrawal of aid and to be told why this action is being taken.
  • appeal. An administrative appeal process reviews student requests for reconsideration. Contact the Office of Financial Aid to appeal the award. After speaking with a staff member, students will be asked to submit a letter of appeal, along with appropriate supporting documents, to the Office of Financial Aid.
  • apply for emergency or short-term loan assistance if students encounter an emergency or unexpected expense.
  • know what financial aid programs are available.
  • know what the estimated cost of attendance is for the period of enrollment at Scripps College.
  • know what the procedures and deadlines are for submitting applications and supporting documentation.
  • know what portion of financial aid is offered in the form of a loan that must be repaid, and the terms and conditions of that loan.

Financial Aid Recipient Responsibilities

Financial Aid Recipients have the responsibility to:

  • use financial aid funds only for educationally related expenses such as tuition, fees, room, board, books, supplies, and living costs.
  • report on their federal tax return any amount of grants and scholarships that exceeds tuition, fees, books, and supplies.
  • respond to requests and inquiries from federal, state, and College auditors.
  • keep copies of all correspondence regarding their financial aid from the Scripps College Office of Financial Aid, governmental agencies, or outside lenders or grantors.
  • repay loans on time so that funds will be available for other students.
  • attend a Loan Entrance Interview before borrowing a student loan for the first time and a Loan Exit Interview before they leave Scripps College (due to graduation, leave of absence, transfer or withdrawal) if they have received any student loans while attending.
  • report changes in their financial status and report any additional funds, benefits or resources from any source (such as employment or scholarship) before or after they are awarded financial aid.
  • report if they move, change their name or marital status, drop below full-time status, take a leave of absence, withdraw from the College, or make any other changes that affect their financial situation.

Scholarships

All Scripps students with demonstrated financial need, who have submitted an annual Scholarship Recipient Form, are identified and matched with the need-based scholarships listed below by the Stewardship Office. In addition to the listings that follow, all eligible students will be considered for general scholarship funds.

Students must complete and return the data form to the Stewardship Office before the beginning of the academic year.

The Ahmanson Foundation Scholarship was established at Scripps College in 1979. The scholarship is awarded to students who are in need of financial assistance to meet the costs of tuition.

The Denise Elizabeth Anderson ’63 Memorial Scholarship was established in 2005 by David Anderson of the Lennox Foundation in memory of his sister. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need.

The Hollis Norris Anderson ’31 Memorial Scholarship was established in 2005 by David Anderson of the Lennox Foundation in memory of his mother. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need.

Anonymous Scholarship was established in 2006 by the estate of a donor who wished to remain anonymous. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need with preference given to a James E. Scripps scholar from North Carolina.

The Yuki Aoki Scholarship in Music was established in 1994 by the Aoki family. The scholarship is named after Mr. Aoki’s mother and honors their daughter, Yoshiko, a member of the class of ’94. It is awarded to a student with financial need, preferably a music major.

The Asian Student Fund Scholarship was established in 1981 by the Ishiyama Foundation. The fund supports scholarships for students from Japan and other Asian countries. The scholarship is awarded to students with financial need.

The Dorothy Cruickshank Backstrand ’32 Memorial Scholarship was established in 2007 by the Estate of Dorothy Cruickshank Backstrand ’32 and awarded to a student with financial need.

The Bekavac Family Scholarship was established in 1999 by Scripps College President Nancy Y. Bekavac and is available to students who have financial need, with preference given to those who are the first in their family to attend college.

The Nancy Y. Bekavac Scholarship was established by alumnae, family, and friends in honor of Nancy Y. Bekavac’s 10th anniversary as the president of Scripps. Consistent with her focus on access to education for all motivated students, the scholarship is awarded to students who have financial need and are the first in their family to attend college.

The Catharine Raynolds Berger Memorial Scholarship was established in 1991 to commemorate Mrs. Berger, by her husband Donelson L. Berger, her daughter Catharine Berger Gilson ’71, and other family and friends. This scholarship is awarded to students who have financial need with preference given to reentry students (age 24 or older) who are U.S. citizens and are juniors or seniors.

The Betty Lewis Bixby ’33 Memorial Scholarship was established in 1995 in memory of this member of the class of 1933. Betty Bixby, who was awarded the Ellen Browning Scripps Award in 1982 for outstanding service to Scripps College, served on the Board of Trustees from 1968 until her death in 1995. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need.

The Mr. and Mrs. Fred H. Bixby Scholarship was established in 1931 by Mr. and Mrs. Bixby and is one of the first endowed scholarships of the College. Mrs. Bixby was an early member of the Board of Trustees. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need.

The Brad and Mary Anne Blaine Scholarship in Early European History and Culture, established in 2006 by Bradford Blaine, professor of history emeritus, and his wife Mary Anne, to assist a student with financial need who is pursuing a major or minor in aspects of early European history and culture, or showing academic interest in these areas by pursuing courses pertaining to this period. The courses may include, but not be limited to, art, history, culture, economics, political or other intellectual studies focused on the fourth through the fourteenth century in Europe. Qualifying courses may be taken at Scripps College and at the other colleges in the Claremont consortium.

The Sharon (Walther ’64) and Michael Blasgen Scholarship, established in 2004 by Sharon Blasgen, a member of the class of 1964, and her husband, Michael, to assist a student with financial need.

The Jean Presley Bowles ’44 Memorial Scholarship was established in 1998 by Newton Bowles in honor of his late wife, a member of the class of 1944. The scholarship award is based on financial need and academic merit. It is preferred that the recipients show an interest in the universal civil, political, economic, and personal rights of children.

The Lois Love Brown ’34 Scholarship was established in 2006 in memory of this Scripps alumna, a member of the class of 1934. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need who is studying art or music.

The Margaret Norris Brown ’35 Memorial Scholarship, originally named the Lennox Foundation Scholarship, was established in 1989 through the generosity of Margaret Norris Brown and the Lennox Foundation. The scholarship was renamed in 2005. It is awarded to students with financial need.

The Nancy Ann Busch-Rossnagel ’72 Scholarship was established in 1987 by Nancy Busch-Rossnagel ’72 and Stephen Rossnagel. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need with a preference for those who are academically meritorious and majoring in child or general psychology.

The Geoffrey Carrington Camp Memorial Current Year Scholarship was established by Sarah Higbie Camp ’65 in memory of her son. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need.

The Edna Van Wart Castera Memorial Scholarship was established in 1969 with a bequest from the estate of Mrs. Castera. The scholarship is awarded to students who have financial need with preference given to those who are academically talented.

The Elise and Merrick Chaffee Memorial Scholarship was established in 1998 by Mr. and Mrs. A.C. Helmholz and their daughter Chalan Helmholz Colby ’61 in memory of Chalan’s children.

The scholarship is awarded to a student who has financial need with preference given to one who has a strong academic record.

The Mr. and Mrs. Oliver P. Clark Scholarship and Lecture Fund was established in 1943 with a bequest from Mrs. Clark, to be administered under the direction and supervision of the Board of Trustees of Scripps College.

The Class of ’31 Scholarship, established by this class in honor of its 55th reunion, is awarded to a student with financial need and who has shown academic excellence.

The Class of ’33 Scholarship, established by this class in honor of its 50th reunion, is awarded for general scholarship purposes to a student who demonstrates financial need.

The Class of ’36 Scholarship, established by this class in honor of its 50th reunion, is a four-year scholarship awarded to an incoming first-year who demonstrates financial need.

The Class of ’37 Scholarship, established by this class in honor of its 50th reunion, is awarded based on financial need with preference given to a junior or senior who attended Scripps her previous two years and maintained a meritorious academic record. Secondarily, a transfer student may be considered. If a junior or senior does not qualify for this scholarship, the scholarship may be awarded to another qualified student with financial need.

The Class of ’39 Fund Scholarship, established by this class in honor of its 50th reunion, is awarded to a student demonstrating financial need and maintaining a B average or higher.

The Class of ’40 Scholarship, established by this class in honor of its 50th reunion, is awarded to juniors or seniors with financial need, who have exhibited outstanding achievement through their first two years at the College. Secondarily, a deserving transfer student may be considered.

The Class of ’41 Scholarship, established by this class in honor of its 50th reunion, is awarded to a student showing financial need and academic excellence.

The Class of ’42 Scholarship, established by this class in honor of its 55th reunion, is awarded to a student with financial need. Preference is given to a student with an outstanding academic record.

The Class of ’45 Scholarship, established by members of this class in honor of the 50th anniversary of their graduation, is awarded to a student with financial need. Preference is for a student with an outstanding academic record.

The Class of ’47 Scholarship was established in 1997 by the members and friends of this Scripps graduating class to commemorate their 50th class reunion. The scholarship is awarded to a student who has financial need.

The Class of ’57 Scholarship, established by this class in honor of its 25th reunion, is awarded to a student with financial need. Preference is given to children or grandchildren of graduates of the class of 1957. In the event no applicants meet these criteria, the scholarship is awarded to other eligible students.

The Class of ’58 Scholarship, established by this class in honor of its 25th reunion, is awarded to a deserving student with financial need.

The Class of ’61 Scholarship, established by this class in honor of its 50th reunion, is awarded to students with financial need.

The Class of ’70 Scholarship, established by this class in honor of its 40th reunion, is awarded to a student with financial need.

The Class of ’71 Scholarship, established by this class in honor of its 25th reunion, is awarded to a student with financial need. Preference is given to a student with an outstanding academic record.

The Hillary Rodham Clinton Scholarship was established in 1994 on the occasion of her selection as the first recipient of the Ellen Browning Scripps Medal, which is awarded to women whose pioneering accomplishments, like those of Miss Scripps, have made a significant and positive difference in the life possibilities available to women. The Ellen Browning Scripps Medal was awarded to the nation’s First Lady in recognition of the many contributions she has made to provide opportunities for women to improve their own lives. This scholarship provides support to a financially deserving student who is chosen by the College for both her accomplishments and potential.

The Colorado Scholarship was established in 1968 by Miss Marjorie S. Crouch in memory of her father, James A.M. Crouch of Fort Morgan, Colorado. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need, preferably from Colorado. If there are, in any year, no eligible candidates from Colorado, the funds are awarded to eligible candidates from any of the 11 western states except California.

The Columbia House Scholarship was established in 1995 by the family of an alumna for general educational purposes. Any Scripps student who demonstrates financial need and is a citizen of the United States is eligible.

The Madelaine Thackston Currie ’36 Scholarship was established in 1945 by the Scripps College Alumnae Association in memory of Madelaine Thackston Currie ’36. The scholarship is awarded to a student who qualifies for financial aid with preference given to the sister or daughter of a Scripps graduate or former student.

The Donna Darnell ’56 Current Year Scholarship was established by this member of the class of 1956 and is awarded to students with financial need.

The Deborah A. David ’72 and Norman Kurland Scholarship (please see the Awards  section)

The Phil Dike Scholarship was established in 1986 by friends and alumnae of the College to honor the 80th birthday of this distinguished former professor of art at Scripps. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need. Preference is given to a student in the studio arts; however, qualified students in other allied fields are also considered.

The Dorothy Drake Memorial Scholarships (For description, please see the “Scholarships and Grants” section under Financial Aid in this catalog.)

The Marian Orr Duffy ’75 Memorial Scholarship was established in 1988 by family and friends in memory of Marian Orr Duffy ’75. Matching gifts were provided by the George H. Mayr Educational Foundation. The scholarship provides support for an intellectually and financially deserving student, with strong preference for one who has chosen to pursue studies in connection with a Scripps year abroad or other affiliated program.

The Jane Lueddemann Ehrman ’41 Scholarship was established in 2011 by Anne Munro, the daughter of this Scripps alumna, and her husband, David Munro. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need.

The Nancy Freeman Ellett ’58 and Norman Townsend Ellett Memorial Scholarship was established in 1977 by friends and family members of Nancy Freeman Ellett, a trustee of the College. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need, “whose spirit and abilities have not yet been reflected in their academic record.”

The Mary Margaret “Molly” Murphy Elliott ’90 Memorial Scholarship was established in 1997 in memory of this member of the class of 1990. The scholarship was created as a tribute to Molly by her classmates, family, and friends. It is awarded to a student who has financial need, preferably from Arizona.

The Ruth Epstein Memorial Scholarship was established in 1992 by the Epstein family to honor the memory of Ruth Epstein, a talented pianist and entertainer. The scholarship is awarded on the basis of financial need with preference given to a deserving music major, preferably a pianist. Mrs. Epstein’s son, Daniel Epstein, is a former Scripps trustee; her granddaughter is Julie Epstein ’90.

The Jackie Espiau Scholarship was established in 1993. This scholarship is awarded based on financial need with preference given to a student who has exhibited academic excellence and is enrolled in either the College’s five-year Combined Degree Program in business administration or who has expressed an interest in business administration as an area of concentration.

The Esterly International Scholarship was established in 1947 by Miss Josephine G. Seaman of La Jolla, California, in memory of her friend, Virginia Judy Esterly. It is awarded to a deserving student with financial need, with a preference for one who is from either Asia or Europe and who meets the academic requirements of Scripps College.

The Juliet King Esterly ’34 Scholarship was established in 1954, and greatly enhanced in 1979 by an alumna, as an expression of admiration for the ability and accomplishments of Juliet King Esterly ’34. The scholarship is awarded to students with financial need, with strong preference given to those who are visually impaired or blind. In addition, the recipient should demonstrate scholastic achievement and possess character and personal qualities that indicate future success in the chosen field of study. An applicant who is not blind or visually handicapped may be considered if the student has chosen a field of interest related to the service of those with physical challenges.

The Florence and Mary B. Eyre Scholarship was established in 1986 to honor this esteemed former professor of psychology at Scripps, Mary B. Eyre, and her sister, Florence. The scholarship is awarded based on financial need, with preference given to a student who is interested in psychology, particularly child psychology.

The Faculty and Staff Scholarship was established in 2009 by many members of the staff and faculty at Scripps. The scholarship gives preference to Scripps students who are Scripps College Academy (SCA) alumnae. The award is loan-relieving the year the student receives the scholarship. In the student’s subsequent years at Scripps, the standard loan amount is replaced by Scripps grant funds.

The Fine Arts Foundation Memorial Scholarship was established in 1937. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need with a preference for art students of notable ability.

The Thomas and Margaret Fleming Memorial Scholarship was established in 1986 by members of their family, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Rhodes (Betty Fleming ’37) and Mr. and Mrs. John Fleming (Zemula Pierce ’47). The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need, preferably a junior or senior who has demonstrated outstanding leadership and a concern for socioeconomic problems and issues that reach beyond the confines of the campus. The recipient should also display academic achievement of the highest order. An exceptional sophomore may be awarded the scholarship if the other criteria is met.

The Zemula Pierce Fleming ’47 Scholarship was established in 2001 by this member of the class of 1947 and her husband, John Fleming, a trustee of Scripps College. The scholarship is awarded to students with financial need, with a preference given to those majoring in art history, music, English, studio art, or classics.

The Sarah Stauffer Francoeur ’38 Memorial Scholarship was established in 1989 by members of the Francoeur and Stauffer families. The scholarship is awarded to students with financial need, preferably those who are academically meritorious and participating in the advanced study of romance languages, either as a major, or included within the course of study of another area of concentration.

The Mrs. Carolyn C. Franklin and Dr. Carl M. Franklin Memorial Scholarship was established by their sons Mr. Sterling Franklin and Mr. Laurence C. Franklin, through the Morris S. Smith Foundation. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need. Preference is given to a junior or senior with an interest in American or English literature or who intends to become a librarian, in recognition of the academic interests of Mrs. Carolyn C. Franklin.

The Nellie G. Fryer Memorial Scholarship in Art was established in 1974 by family members of Nellie G. Fryer. Recipients are selected on the basis of financial need, talent in art, and an expressed interest in art as a profession, preferably in painting or sculpture.

The Christine Galitzi Memorial Scholarship was established in 1969 in memory of Christine Galitzi Bratescu, a former member of the Scripps faculty, by her many friends. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need with preference given to a foreign student.

The Augusta E. Galster Memorial Scholarship was established in 1969 by Emil Galster in memory of his sister who was a distinguished teacher and scholar in economics. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need.

The Robert H. Garrison Scholarship was established in 1984 to recognize Mr. Garrison’s distinguished service to Scripps College as a member of its Board of Trustees. The scholarship is awarded to students with financial need with a preference for those who are meritorious and are from the Pomona or San Gabriel Valleys.

The General Scholarship Fund is supported by numerous friends of Scripps College and is awarded to students with financial need.

The Katharine H. Glass Scholarship was established in 2000. The name of this scholarship was changed in 2005 by Joanne Glass Keith ’63, a trustee of the College, to honor the memory of her mother. It is awarded to a first-year student with financial need.

The James W. Gould Scholarship in International Relations was established in 1989 by family, friends, and alumnae to honor the long tenure of this outstanding professor of history and international relations at Scripps College. The scholarship is awarded to students with financial need, who have outstanding achievement with a particular interest in the promotion of human rights and a peaceful resolution to international conflicts and global concerns.

The Harold Graham Memorial Scholarship in Art was established in 1965 by the family and friends of Mr. Graham in memory of this distinguished designer who was a member of the original art faculty at Scripps College. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need with a preference for an art major.

The Margaret Gray Memorial Scholarship was established in 1965 by an anonymous donor in memory of Mrs. Philip Gray, wife of a Scripps College faculty member. The scholarship is awarded to students with financial need who are academically deserving.

The Martha Jane Griffin ’68 Scholarship was established in 1974 with a bequest from Virginia Heinrich Griffin, the mother of Martha Jane Griffin ’68. The recipient of this scholarship must show financial need and a possible interest in becoming a professional librarian. The student must be recommended by the College librarian.

The Eleanor J. Ham ’37 Scholarship was established to commemorate Eleanor J. Ham, a member of the class of 1937. The scholarship is awarded to a deserving student with financial need.

The Martha Wehmeier Hammer’66 Scholarship Award (please see the Awards  section)

The Alexa Fullerton Hampton ’42 Scholarship was established in 2000 with a bequest from the estate of Mrs. Hampton, a member of the class of 1942. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need.

The Alice E. Harper Scholarship was established in 1936 by Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Chandler Harper of La Jolla, California, and is awarded to a student with financial need. The scholarship gives preference to graduates of either the Bishop’s School in La Jolla or the La Jolla High School. If there are no scholarship candidates from these schools, it is open to graduates of secondary schools in the San Diego area.

The Margaret C. Hawkins Memorial Scholarship was established in 1977 by family members to honor Mrs. Hawkins, a member of the Scripps family, who served Scripps College as a trustee from 1935 until her death in 1977. The scholarship is awarded to deserving students who need financial assistance.

The William Randolph Hearst Foundation Scholarship was established in 1983 by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation. The scholarship is awarded to deserving students who need financial assistance.

The Susan Lautmann Hertel ’52 Memorial Scholarship in Art was established in 1993 by family and friends in memory of this distinguished artist and alumna of Scripps College. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need who is majoring in studio art.

The Carolyn Andrews Higgs ’42 Memorial Scholarship was established in 1988 by her husband, Donald V. Higgs. The scholarship provides tuition assistance to promising students with financial need who are majoring in studio arts or music.

The Brenda Barham Hill Scholarship was established in 2007 by friends of Brenda, as a tribute to her service at Scripps College as Vice President for Planning and Research and Secretary to the Board of Trustees, and at Claremont University Consortium as Chief Executive Officer. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need.

The Gloria McClintock Holden Scholarship was established in 2005 by Glen Holden in honor of his wife, an emerita trustee of the College. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need.

The Maria Hummer ’65 Scholarship was established in 2004 by this member of the class of 1965 and former trustee of the College. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need.

The Betty Pickering James ’33 Scholarship was established in 1974 with a bequest from Amelia Vera Pickering in honor of her daughter, a Scripps alumna. Awards are made to promising students on the basis of financial need. Each award from this fund is considered morally repayable by the recipient as circumstances in the future may permit.

The Ernest Jaqua Scholarship was established in 2005 by friends and family to honor the memory of Ernest Jaqua, the youngest child of the first president of Scripps College. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need.

The Jaqua/Hardin Memorial Scholarship in Music was established in 1990 through the generosity of the Lluella Morey Murphey Foundation and the families and relatives of Gwen Evans Jaqua and her sister, Alice Evans Hardin. Mrs. Jaqua was the wife of the College’s founding president. Mrs. Hardin was the mother of Margaret “Marky” Hardin Allen ’47. The scholarship is awarded based on financial need with preference given to a student majoring in music with a recommendation by the Music Department.

The Jeanne Jaquith Scholarship was established by Rosemary Jaquith Barrett ’36 and Donald Barrett in memory of Rosemary’s sister, who died in 1923 at the age of 18. In establishing this scholarship, Mr. and Mrs. Barrett hoped to make up in a small way for the contributions Jeanne Jaquith would have made for a better world had she not been denied a longer life. Scholarships are awarded to academically deserving students who have financial need.

The Nancy Glanville Jewell ’49 Endowed Scholarship was established in 2007 by her son, Mr. John Glanville, to honor this emerita trustee of the College. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need.

The Fletcher Jones Scholarship was established in 1982 by the Fletcher Jones Foundation and is awarded to students who have financial need.

The Gabrielle Jungels-Winkler Scholarship Award (please see the Awards  section)

The W.M. Keck Foundation Science Scholarship was established in 1983. Scholarships are awarded to students who have financial need with preference given to science majors.

The Helen Cheney Kimberly Scholarship was established in 1946 by Mrs. Elbert W. Shirk in memory of her mother, Helen Cheney Kimberly. The scholarship is awarded to academically deserving students who have financial need.

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Scholarship was established in 1968 by faculty, students, and friends of Scripps as a memorial to the late Dr. King. This scholarship is awarded to students with financial need and was created to enable qualified students from minority groups to attend Scripps College.

The Nancy (Mayer ’54) and David Knapp Memorial Scholarship was established in 2000 by friends and family members. The scholarship is awarded to a student who has financial need, with a preference given to students of art or psychology. This reflects Nancy Knapp’s long-standing career in and dedication to the field of art therapy.

The Gerry Lahanas Scholarship was established in 1989 by alumnae and friends of the former Scripps athletic director. The recipient must demonstrate leadership ability along with a meritorious scholastic record. Preference is given to a student with a genuine, active interest in athletic participation.

The Ruth Lamb Scholarship, established in 2003 by Stephanie Rasines, a member of the class of 1971, in memory of her Spanish professor who was influential in inspiring her to complete her Scripps education. The scholarship is awarded to a student who has financial need with a preference for a re-entry student.

The Lassiter Family Scholarship, established in 2004 by Leslie Lassiter, a member of the class of 1977. The scholarship is awarded to a student who has financial need with a preference for an African American student.

The Kathleen Sherwood Latimer Memorial Scholarship was established in 1989 in memory of Mrs. Latimer by members of the Latimer family. Her daughter, Margaret Latimer, is a Scripps alumna from the class of 1982. The award is given to a deserving student who demonstrates
financial need and who shows exceptional promise.

The Samella Lewis Scholarship (please see the Awards  section)

The J. M. Long Foundation Endowed Scholarship in Science was established in 1994 and is awarded to science majors who demonstrate financial need and are judged to be outstanding among their peers by members of the science faculty.

The Littie and Stuart Mackeown Memorial Scholarship was established in 1983 by their daughter, Littie Mackeown Hicks ’40. This scholarship assists qualified students with financial need in meeting the cost of education.

The Alfreda Ward Maloof Memorial Scholarship was established in 1999 by Samuel Maloof and friends to commemorate his beloved wife of 50 years. The scholarship honors Alfreda’s life, including her early career as a teacher and her lifetime love of Native American folk art. The scholarship is awarded to a student who has financial need, with preference given to an individual who represents the family’s first generation to attend college.

The Montana Scholarship was established in 1935 by Mrs. H.W. Child of Helena, Montana, and is awarded based on demonstrated financial need to graduates of accredited secondary schools in Montana. If there are no scholarship candidates from Montana, it can be awarded to graduates of secondary schools in the Northwest or other sections of the United States outside California.

The B. Paul Moser Trust Science Scholarship was established in 2000 by the B. Paul Moser Charitable Trust. A large portion of matching funds came from Scripps alumnae who had majored in the sciences. The scholarship is awarded based on demonstrated financial need with a preference for science students who have a strong academic record.

The Maud Barker Neff Scholarship was established in 1969 by Dr. and Mrs. Philip Neff in memory of Dr. Neff’s mother, and is awarded to students in financial need who are studying fine arts, humanities, economics, political science, history, anthropology, geography, linguistics, or philosophy.

The New Generation Scholarships (For description, please see the “Scholarships and Grants” section under Financial Aid in this catalog.)

The Grace Nicholson Scholarship was established in 1951 with a bequest from the estate of Miss Nicholson to enable worthy and deserving young women to attend Scripps College. The recipient is selected on the basis of financial need and scholastic standing, with preference given to a student with a talent in art.

The Lam-Anh Jennifer Nguyen-Phuong Scholarship was established in 2011 by Mr. and Mrs. Lam Nguyen-Phuong through the Capital Group Companies Charitable Foundation. The scholarship is named in memory of their daughter. It is awarded to a student who has financial need from a developing country.

The Margo Leonetti O’Connell ’64 Scholarship (For description, please see the “Scholarships and Grants” section under Financial Aid in this catalog.)

The Sandra Day O’Connor Scholarship was established in 1998 on the occasion of her selection as the second recipient of the Ellen Browning Scripps Medal, which is awarded to women whose pioneering accomplishments, like those of Miss Scripps, have made a significant and positive difference in the life possibilities available to women. The Ellen Browning Scripps Medal was awarded to Supreme Court Justice O’Connor in recognition of the many contributions she has made to provide opportunities for women to improve their own lives. This scholarship provides support to a financially deserving student who is chosen by the College for both accomplishments and potential.

Katherine Laun Olson ’60 Endowed Scholarship was established in 2008 by Katherine Laun Olson, to assist a student who has financial need.

The A. Elizabeth and Robert B. Palmer Memorial Scholarship in Classics was established in 1997 in memory of Mr. and Mrs. Palmer. Robert B. Palmer was a trustee professor of classical studies at Scripps from 1949–1977. The scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need whose major field of study is classics, and who is recommended by the Classics Department. If there are no students who have declared a major in classics, the Department may select another student who has displayed distinguished scholarship and promise in studies in the classics.

The Pattison, McDowell, and Pruessing Memorial Music Scholarship was established in 1974 and is awarded based on financial need with preference given to a student studying music with a recommendation by the Music Department.

The Mignon Pease ’65 Memorial Scholarship was established in 1966 by family and friends in memory of this alumna who lost her life in an automobile accident along with her friend, Betsy Smith, both members of the class of 1965 (see the Betsy Smith ’65 Memorial Scholarship). The Mignon Pease ’65 Memorial Scholarship is awarded to a qualified student who has financial need with a preference for one who is majoring in international relations.

The Ann Peppers Scholarship was established in 1982 by the Ann Peppers Foundation and is awarded to high-achieving students who have financial need.

The JoEllen Pruitt ’85 and John E. Barnhart Memorial Scholarship was established by the family and friends of JoEllen Pruitt, a member of the class of 1985, and the estate of her grandfather, John E. Barnhart. The scholarship is awarded based on financial need for outstanding leadership and academic excellence to a junior or senior. The student must show involvement and leadership in the Scripps community as well as a B+ average or higher.

The Barbara Ralston ’41 Memorial Scholarship was established in 1999 by the Ralston children to honor their mother, a member of the class of ’41. It is awarded based on financial need, to a Latina student with an outstanding academic record.

The Ellen Clark Revelle Scholarship (“The Nellie”) was established in 2011and honors the memory of this alumna and former trustee, Ellen Clark Revelle, a member of Scripps College’s first graduating class of 1931. The scholarship is awarded through an application and interview process. It is awarded to a continuing student, who is making excellent academic process, fully engages in the Scripps College community and beyond through leadership activities, and demonstrates financial need. In addition to receiving the scholarship award toward tuition, the Ellen Clark Revelle Scholar will receive book and internship stipends, a laptop computer, airline tickets, and health insurance.

The Mabel Wilson Richards Scholarship was established in 1965 with a bequest from the estate of Mabel Wilson Richards. It was created to provide scholarship assistance to deserving young women who have demonstrated financial need and who are residents of and attend college in Southern California.

The Ellen Blair Richstone ’73 Scholarship in International Relations was established in 1991 to honor the 40th birthday of Ellen B. Richstone ’73. The scholarship is awarded based on financial need to academically meritorious students who are majoring in international relations, political science, or economics.

The Viivi Soolepp Romine ’56 Scholarship was established by this Scripps alumna in 2005 and is awarded to a student with financial need.

The Rose Hills Foundation Science and Engineering Scholarship was established in 2010 by the Rose Hills Foundation. Based on approval by the Foundation, the scholarship is awarded to students with financial need who are sophomores, juniors, or seniors majoring in engineering or the life or natural sciences, are U.S. citizens with permanent addresses in Southern California (south of the Tehachapi Mountains), and have a cumulative grade point average of 3.5, based on a 4.0 scale.

The Henry Scamman Scholarship was established in 1935 by Miss Edith Scamman in honor of her father. The scholarship is awarded based on financial need and gives preference to graduates of an accredited secondary school in New England. If there are no candidates from that area, the scholarship is open to graduates of accredited secondary schools in the Middle Atlantic States or other sections of the United States east of the Mississippi River.

Scripps College QuestBridge Scholarships (For description, please see the “Scholarships and Grants” section under Financial Aid in this catalog.)

The James E. Scripps Scholarships (For description, please see the “Scholarships and Grants” section under Financial Aid in this catalog.)

The Seaver Institute Scholarship was established in 1982 by the Seaver Institute to assist academically talented students who have financial need.

The Senior Class Scholarship is an annual scholarship established by each graduating class of Scripps College. It is awarded to a student who has financial need and a high academic standing.

The Alice Shapiro Memorial Scholarship was established in 1986 by friends and alumnae of Scripps College to honor this internationally acclaimed pianist and esteemed Scripps professor of music for her deep commitment to her students. This scholarship is awarded based on financial need to a deserving student, with preference given to a pianist, who has been recommended by the music faculty.

The Millard Sheets Scholarship was established in 1960 by the Scripps College Alumnae Association in honor of Millard Sheets, professor of art and Balch lecturer emeritus. It is awarded based on financial need to a new student at the College, with preference given to the daughter of an alumna.

The Helena “O’Bie” Shultz Memorial Scholarship was established in 1995 with a gift from Eileen Schock Laspa ’67 in memory of Helena “O’Bie” Shultz, the late wife of former Secretary of State George Shultz. It is awarded to students who demonstrate financial need with a preference for those who aspire to work in the field of children’s health organizations.

The Betsy Smith ’65 Memorial Scholarship was established in 1966 by family and friends in memory of this alumna who lost her life in an automobile accident along with her friend, Mignon Pease, both members of the class of 1965 (see the Mignon Pease ’65 Memorial Scholarship). The Betsy Smith ’65 Memorial Scholarship is awarded to a qualified student who has financial need with a preference for one who is majoring in international relations.

The Winifred Wig Smith ’38 Scholarship was established by Winnie Wig Smith, a member of the class of 1938, and her husband, Robert, to assist a student with financial need.

The Sara Stanley ’78 Memorial Scholarship was established in 1983 by Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Stanley in honor of their daughter, Sara Stanley, a member of the class of 1978. It is awarded to a junior or a senior with financial need and demonstrated academic excellence. Preference is given to a student with an interest in American studies.

The John Stauffer Scholarship for Excellence in Chemistry and the Physical Sciences was established in 1981. The scholarship is awarded based on financial need to a senior who has demonstrated excellence in the area of physical science or chemistry.

The Harry and Grace Steele Foundation Scholarship was established in 1970 with grants from the Steele Foundation. The scholarship is awarded to a student who demonstrates financial need and academic excellence.

The Albert Stewart Memorial Scholarship in Art was established in 1965 by the Fine Arts Foundation of Scripps College in memory of this world-renowned artist and sculptor who taught at Scripps College for more than 25 years. The scholarship is awarded based on financial need to a student majoring in art, preferably with an interest in sculpture or drawing.

The Elizabeth Younglove Suffel ’33 Scholarship was established in 2001 by Elizabeth Suffel, a member of the class of 1933, and mother of the late Lucia Suffel, a member of the class of 1960. The scholarship is awarded to students who have financial need.

The Jesse Swan Scholarship was established in 1997 to honor Jesse R. Swan, Jr. (professor of theatre arts at Scripps, Claremont McKenna, Harvey Mudd, and Pitzer Colleges from 1956–1976). It is awarded to a junior or senior at Scripps every fourth year (beginning in 1996–97) in recognition of outstanding work in, and potential for continued growth in, any of the areas encompassing the full scope of the theatrical arts.

The Evalyn Starr Thacker ’48 Scholarship was established in 1945 in memory of Evalyn Starr Thacker ’48 by her family and friends. It is awarded to a meritorious student who has financial need.

The Barbara Brooks Tomblin ’66 and Fred Tomblin Current Year Scholarship was established by Barbara Brooks Tomblin ’66 and her husband, Fred, to assist a student with financial need.

The Wadleigh Scholarship was established in 1948 by Harriet C. Wadleigh and George H. Wadleigh. The scholarship is awarded to students who demonstrate financial need and who have been enrolled at Scripps College for at least two years.

The Irving M. Walker Scholarship was established in 1969 in memory of Mr. Walker, a member of the original Board of Trustees and its chair for 27 years, by his friends and fellow trustees. It is awarded to students who demonstrate financial need.

The Alice Colby Wheeler Scholarship was established in 1974 with a bequest from the estate of Alice Colby Wheeler. It is awarded to students with financial need.

The Marian Williams ’37 Memorial Scholarship was established in 1965 by Mr. and Mrs. Joseph T. Williams in memory of their daughter, a member of the class of 1937, who “would have wanted to help provide an opportunity for deserving students to attend the College which helped mold her life. She never forgot what Scripps did for her.” It is awarded to students who have financial need.

The Alyce de Roulet Williamson ’52 Scholarship was established by this Scripps alumna in 2008 and is awarded to a student with financial need.

The Aseneth Louise Willits ’60 Memorial Scholarship was established in 1986 by the family and friends of Aseneth Louise Willits ’60. The scholarship is awarded to a student who demonstrates financial need and is committed to enhancing major course of study by including a wide range of courses in the humanities.

The Arthur Woods Scholarship in International Affairs was established in 1969 by his widow, Mrs. W. Randolph Burgess. The scholarship honors Mr. Woods, a distinguished public servant and exemplar of the humanities, and the father of Mrs. Carolie Woods Noble ’47. The scholarship is awarded based on financial need to students in their junior or senior year who have demonstrated an interest in foreign affairs. Preference is given to female descendants of the officers and men who served aboard the U.S.S. Thresher at the time of its sinking, even if the student is not interested in the general field of international affairs.

Annual Fund Scholarships

For current list of Annual Fund Scholarships with full descriptions, please refer to the Scripps College website at www.scrippscollege.edu.

For More Information

For further information, applications, or assistance in selecting a particular plan or program, please contact:

Scripps College
Office of Financial Aid
1030 Columbia Avenue, PMB 1293
Claremont, California 91711-3905
Office (909) 621-8275
Fax (909) 607-7742



Skip Navigation